New Street in Swansea

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(Above) The top of Orchard Street in 1916. The older houses of New Street are lost amongst a mass of later Victorian development. The New Street houses were erected by 1820 and are a basic square two up and two down layout. There were no rear projections, cooking and eating were functions of the same room at the back of the house. Some people did not like this arrangement and built a little outhouse or scullery on the back of the house to make the shape more rectangular. Tudor Court is a classic example of courtyard expansion in the 1830s to meet the demand for cheap housing, other examples of houses built in the gardens of early houses can also be seen in New Street. 

The later houses are a mix of commercial and large residential properties. They are characterised by an elongated rectangular shape, many have developed tunnel backs or rear extensions, and the increase in property values is often indicated by the lack of open or garden space.

 

 

The View for Sunday October 15 2000

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